Dr. Eric Berkowitz

 

Eric Berkowitz

Associate Professor

Assistant Chair, Department of Computer Science
and Information Technology

Director, Network Computing


Roosevelt University

Department of Computer Science and Information Technology

CST 402
Cloud Computing and Virtualization
Instructor: Eric Berkowitz
SCH 621


Email: eberkowitz@roosevelt.edu
Office: Gage 502c

Course description:
The course has a team seminar format:  I will ask you to think and write, to discuss, explain and come to class prepared to make a constructive contribution to the discussion or team project. You may be required to investigate an issue and present all sides of it to the class or to defend one side or another in a discussion.  You may be required to investigate a technology and explain it to the class.  You may be required to investigate how that technology might be applied to an ongoing team project and to compellingly argue the superiority of your technology over other competing technologies, perhaps even those being simultaneously investigated by your classmate(s).  This will all be done in a friendly atmosphere of respect and collegial debate intended to foster the type of thorough investigation and deep thinking required to present and defend a point of view in a group discussion.  You will also need to investigate issues and present possibly (most likely unknown) solutions to problems that arise. 

You will also be asked to submit one or more formal papers. 

Your grade will be determined by your participation and the quality of your work.  Remember -- details do matter.  Other important facts are how frequent and good your suggestions and proposed solutions are.  How well grounded and researched your proposals are is a crucial component of your grade as is your demonstrated ability to round-out and expand upon that which is discussed or presented in class with your own research and investigation of worthy sources.


Required Text:



The course will cover many of the papers in this text including: 

Part I: Cloud Base
Tools and Technologies for Building Clouds
A Taxonomy, Survey and Issues of Cloud Computing Ecosystems
Towards a Taxonomy for Cloud Computing from an e-Science Perspective
Examining Cloud Computing from the Perspective of Grid and Computer-Supported Cooperative Work
Overview of Cloud Standards
Part II: Cloud Seeding
Open and Interoperable Clouds: the Cloud@HomeWay
A Peer-to-Peer Framework for Supporting MapReduce Applications in Dynamic Cloud Environments
Enhanced Network Support for Scalable Computing Clouds
YML-PC: A Reference Architecture Based on Workflow for Building Scientific Private Clouds
An Efficient Framework for Running Applications on Clusters, Grids and Clouds
Resource Management for Hybrid Grid and Cloud Computing
Peer-to-Peer Cloud Provisioning: Service Discovery and Load-Balancing
Mixing Grids and Clouds: High-throughput Science using the Nimrod Tool Family
Part III: Cloud Breaks
Cloud Compliance: A Framework for Using Cloud Computing in a Regulated World
Cloud Computing: Data Confidentiality and Interoperability Challenges
Security Issues to Cloud Computing
Securing the Cloud
Part IV: Cloud Feedback
Technologies for Enforcement and Distribution of Policy in Cloud Architectures
The PRISM On-demand Digital Media Cloud
Cloud Economics: Principles, Costs and Benefits
Towards Application-Specific Service Level Agreements: Experiments in Clouds and Grids

Technical topics will also be discussed in this course particularly in the context of of the iBrarian project and applied cloud computing, including systems such as early x86 virtualization projects: VMware, VirtualPC, Hadoop and its associated projects, Dryad, Xgrid, MPI and other relevant projects as needed based on the progression of the course discussion and projects and the time available to us.

On the business side we may investigate more interesting future-cost topics such as SLAs, dependance, (un)certainty factors, ownership, custody, culture, FERPA, HIPPA and other issues of concern to those involve in the decision making process. 
 
Only a few of the articles and topics listed above can actually be covered by this course. You might consider those not covered as possible places for in-depth work or a project. The remainder of this syllabus details the expectations and requirements for this course.

Summary of background knowledge for the course

Students are expected to have a BA or BS in Computer Science, Information Technology, Business, Economics or related fields and to be willing to enhance, expand, and even challenge, their existing knowledge with the wisdom of other disciplines and to contribute their talents to a global project of corporate magnitude.


Course Objectives:
When the student completes this course she/he should have a thorough understanding of the following:
	The origins of cloud computing
	What cloud computing is -- and isn't
	The technical foundations of cloud computing
	The implementation foundations of cloud computing
	The social, societal, economic, personal, etc. implementation of cloud computing's future
	The nature of working on a cloud computing project.


Attendance and Participation Policy.
Students' attendance is required. Students are supposed to learn the material from peer presentations. Missing more than two sessions during the semester will result in a failing grade.  Weekly, constructive, contributions, to in class discussions and ongoing class projects are a graded requirement of the course without which a student will not receive a passing grade.


Prerequisite Components for a passing grade:
If a student is missing any of these, the student will receive a grade of D or lower regardless of other elements.  Each of these, individually constitutes an absolute condition for passing this course:
1. Discussion, Participation, and prepared contributions to in-class projects or discussions.
2. Homework at least 90% submitted
3. Papers and Projects 100% submitted.

Grading Policy: 
Given that the above criteria are met, the grade will be computed as follows:
1. Discussion participation and preparation (including prep-notes):  25%
2. Papers and assignments, project, out-of-class work: 45%
3. Mid-term examinations and/or other in-class work:  15%
4. Homework and/or quizzes: 15%

Grading: >92 A, 90-92 A-, 88-89, B+,82-88 B, 80-82 B-, 70-79 C, 60-69 D, <60 F

Late Work:
Late work is not accepted in this class.


Participation:
Class Participation is REQUIRED:
Showing up to class, on time, with all readings prepared, all work ready for submission and ready to constructively and critically participate in discussions and common efforts is required.  A student who misses 3 classes will loose one letter grade.  A student with 4 absences will receive a grade of F.  Arriving late or unprepared is equivalent to an absence.  Students are expected to contribute on the days they are present.  A student, when speaking is expected to say their name clearly and loudly and then speak their contribution so that all listeners can understand it without it needing to be repeated.   Students may be called upon by the instructor.

Distractions:
Students are expected to be participating in the class.  Students found to be engaging in other activities while in the classroom will be instructed to leave. This will be counted as an absence.

Elluminate Participants:
Those participating in the course using Elluminate are required to actively contribute to verbal discussions and are required to use appropriate audio equipment on their computer for doing so.  This requires one of the following:
a headset with a microphone such as Amazon Headphones search
an echo canceling speakerphone such as Amazon USB Speakerphone search
The built-in speaker and microphones in  laptop/netbook computers cause echo and feedback and may not be used, so again, either 1 or 2 above is required. 

Students must have this equipment by the second week of class and make themselves familiar with its use in Elluminate.  The Elluminate technical support team can assist them with any issues they may have in this regard.

Policy Regarding Cheating:
A student's first instance of academic dishonesty will result in a failing grade for the course. Additional University sanctions may be imposed as described in University policies. More details on the University's policies on academic honesty may be found in the Student Handbook.  Second chances on cheating are not available in this class.

A.D.A Policy:
If you have a disability for which you are or may be requesting an accommodation, you are encouraged to contact the Office of Disabled Student Services, 312-341-3810, or e-mail nlitke@roosevelt.edu as early as possible in the term.

RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS POLICY [from the Student Handbook]
 
Roosevelt University respects the rights of students to observe major religious holidays and will make accommodations, upon request, for such observances. Students who wish to observe religious holidays must inform their instructors in writing within the first two weeks of each semester of their intent to observe the holiday so that alternative arrangements convenient to both students and faculty can be made at the earliest opportunity. Students who make such arrangements by the deadline will not be required to attend classes or take examinations on the designated days, and faculty must provide reasonable opportunities for such students to make up missed work and examinations.   However, all work missed for such absences, including papers and examinations, must be made up. Students who do not arrange for excused absences by the deadline are not entitled to such accommodations. 

E-mail:
Students are expected to monitor their official Roosevelt University e-mail account and to use that account for inquiries regarding this class.


Tentative Class Schedule:

This Schedule will change as the course discussion and team project progresses.  This will be covered concurrently with Cloud Computing/ Big Data, project work and a selection of more current research papers to be announced each term.

Week 1
Introductions
Definitions
Background
Week 2
Tools and Technologies for Building Clouds
A Taxonomy, Survey and Issues of Cloud Computing Ecosystems
Week 3
Towards a Taxonomy for Cloud Computing from an e-Science Perspective
Examining Cloud Computing from the Perspective of Grid and Computer-Supported Cooperative Work
Overview of Cloud Standards
Week 4
Open and Interoperable Clouds: the Cloud@HomeWay
A Peer-to-Peer Framework for Supporting MapReduce Applications in Dynamic Cloud Environments
Enhanced Network Support for Scalable Computing Clouds
Week 5
YML-PC: A Reference Architecture Based on Workflow for Building Scientific Private Clouds
Week 6
An Efficient Framework for Running Applications on Clusters, Grids and Clouds
Resource Management for Hybrid Grid and Cloud Computing
Peer-to-Peer Cloud Provisioning: Service Discovery and Load-Balancing
Week 7
Mixing Grids and Clouds: High-throughput Science using the Nimrod Tool Family
Week 8
Cloud Compliance: A Framework for Using Cloud Computing in a Regulated World
Week 9
Cloud Computing: Data Confidentiality and Interoperability Challenges
Week 10
Security Issues to Cloud Computing
Week 11
Securing the Cloud
Week 12
Technologies for Enforcement and Distribution of Policy in Cloud Architectures
Week 13
The PRISM On-demand Digital Media Cloud
Week 14
Cloud Economics: Principles, Costs and Benefits
Week 15
Towards Application-Specific Service Level Agreements: Experiments in Clouds and Grids
mailto:eberkowitz@roosevelt.edu?subject=CST%20413http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=computer+headphones&x=0&y=0#/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_35?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=computer+headphones+with+microphone&sprefix=computer+headphones+with+microphone&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Acomputer+headphones+with+microphonehttp://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=speakerphone&x=0&y=0#/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=usb+speakerphone&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Ausb+speakerphoneshapeimage_8_link_0shapeimage_8_link_1shapeimage_8_link_2

Cloud Computing:

Principles, Systems and Applications

Series: Computer Communications and Networks

Antonopoulos, Nick; Gillam, Lee (Eds.)

1st Edition., 2010, XVII, 379 p., Hardcover

ISBN: 978-1-84996-240-7

CST 
402 
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