Dr. Eric Berkowitz

 

Eric Berkowitz

Associate Professor

Assistant Chair, Department of Computer Science
and Information Technology

Director, Network Computing


Roosevelt University

Department of Computer Science and Information Technology

CST 413
Seminar 
Information in Society 
Use, Cooperation, Collaberation, Storage, Management 
Instructor: Eric Berkowitz
Gage room 502-B 


Email: eberkowitz@roosevelt.edu

Course description:
The course has seminar format:  I will ask you to think and write, to discuss, explain and justify your arguments.  Toy will need to write-up and present possible (most likely unknown) solutions to problems that arise. You will also be asked to present one or more papers. The grade will be determined by your participation: how frequent and good your suggestions and proposed solutions are.  How well grounded and researched your proposals are is a crucial component of your grade as is your demonstrated ability to round-out and expand upon that which is discussed or presented in class with your own research and investigation of worthy sources.

The course focuses the economy, community, politics and the balance of cost, risk and reward surrounding computers in society. In a field as fluid as computing, the intersection of computeres with each of these dimensions changes from year to year and therefore we will be using a collection of articles as the foundation for this course.



	Unit 1: Foundation
	Unit 2: The Economy
	Unit 3: Work and the Workplace
	Unit 4: Computers, People and Social Participation
	Unit 5: Societal Institutions
	Unit 6: Risk
	Unit 7: International Perspective
	Unit 8: Power and Absolute Power, Personal, Corporate and Governmental
	Unit 9: Privacy and anonymity
	Unit 10: Societal Memory
	Unit 11: Communications Tools
	


Only a few of these can actually be covered by this course. You might consider those not covered as possible places for in-depth work or a project. The remainder of this syllabus details the expectations and requirements for this course.
Summary of background knowledge for the course

Students are expected to have a BA or BS in Computer Science, Information Technology, Business, Economics or related fields.

Course Objectives:
When the student completes this course she/he should have a thorough understanding of the following:
	Information’s role in society in general
	Information in organizations
	The effect of computers on the various aspects of our personal and public lives
	Incomplete information sharing – privacy
	The role of public and private information stores
	Social memory for electronic information

Textbook:

Annual Editions: Computers in Society 10/11


A sample of the type of articles we might look at appears below.  Of course this list is much longer than what could possibly be covered in a single semester...


Hollan, James, Edwin Hutchins, and David Kirsh (2000) Distributed Cognition: Toward a New Foundation for Human-Computer Interaction Research. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 7 (2), pp. 174-196.


Erickson, Thomas, David N. Smith, Wendy A. Kellogg, Mark Laff, John T. Richards, and Erin Bradner (1999) Socially Translucent Systems: Social Proxies, Persistent Conversation, and the Design of “Babble”. In Proceedings of the 1999 ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI’99). pp. 72-79.

Grinter, Rebecca E. and Margery A. Eldridge (2001) y do tngers luv 2 txt msg? In Proceedings of the Seventh European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (ECSCW’01). W. Prinz, M. Jarke, Y. Rogers, K. Schmidt, and V. Wulf (eds.). Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 219-238.

O’Connor, Mark, Dan Cosley, Joseph A. Konstan, and John Riedl (2001) PolyLens: A Recommender for Groups of Users. In Proceedings of the Seventh European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (ECSCW’01). W. Prinz, M. Jarke, Y. Rogers, K. Schmidt, and V. Wulf (eds.). Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 199-218.

Wexelblat, Alan, and Pattie Maes (1999) Footprints: History-Rich Tools for Information Foraging. In Proceedings of the 1999 ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI’99). pp. 270-277.

Trigg, Randall H., Jeanette Blomberg, and Lucy Suchman (1999) Moving Document Collections Online: The Evolution of a Shared Repository. In Proceedings of the Sixth European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (ECSCW’99). S. Bodker, M. Kyng and K Schmidt (eds.). Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 331-350.

Martin, David, Tom Rodden, Mark Rouncefield, Ian Sommerville & Stephen Viller. (2001) Finding patterns in the fieldwork. In Proceedings of the Seventh European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (ECSCW’01). W. Prinz, M. Jarke, Y. Rogers, K. Schmidt, and V. Wulf (eds.). Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 39-58.

Suchman, Lucy (1994) Do Categories Have Politics? The Language/Action Perspective Reconsidered. Computer-Supported Collaborative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing 2. pp. 177-190.

Winograd, Terry (1994) Categories, Disciplines, and Social Coordination. Computer-Supported Collaborative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing 2 . pp. 191-197.

Attendance Policy.
Students' attendance is very important: Students are supposed to learn the material from peer presentations. Missing more than two session during the semester will result in a failing grade.

Grading Policy: 
Discussion Participation and Preparation  15%
Papers and Assignments 45%
Mid-term examinations and/or other in-class work  25%
Homework 15%


Grading: >92 A, 90-92 A-, 88-89, B+,82-88 B, 80-82 B-1, 70-79 C, 60-69 D, <60 F


Policy Regarding Cheating.
A students first instance of academic dishonesty will result in a failing grade for the course. Additional University sanctions on may be imposed as described in University policies. More details on the University's policies on academic honesty may be found in the Student Handbook.

A.D.A Policy:
If you have a disability for which you are or may be requesting an accommodation, you are encouraged to contact the Office of Disabled Student Services, 310 Herman Crown Center, 312-341-3810, or e-mail nlitke@roosevelt.edu as early as possible in the term.

RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS POLICY [from the Student Handbook]
 
Roosevelt University respects the rights of students to observe major religious holidays and will make accommodations, upon request, for such observances. Students who wish to observe religious holidays must inform their instructors in writing within the first two weeks of each semester of their intent to observe the holiday so that alternative arrangements convenient to both students and faculty can be made at the earliest opportunity. Students who make such arrangements by the deadline will not be required to attend classes or take examinations on the designated days, and faculty must provide reasonable opportunities for such students to make up missed work and examinations.   However, all work missed for such absences, including papers and examinations, must be made up. Students who do not arrange for excused absences by the deadline are not entitled to such accommodations. 

Tentative Class Schedule

This Schedule will change along with the selection of articles but is here to give you an idea of how the course will progress.

Sources:
In this course Wikipedia is an object of study – not a citable resource.

Weeks 1
Introduction

Weeks 2-3
Unit 1
Fist Paper Assigned

Weeks 3-4
Unit 2

Weeks 4-5
Unit 3 

Week 6, Midterm

Week 7
Unit 4 

Weeks 8-9
Unit 5

Weeks 9-10
Unit 6 

Week 11
Midterm Exam 2

Week 12-13
Unit 7

Week 13-14
Unit 8-9

Week 15
Unit 10-11


mailto:eberkowitz@roosevelt.edu?subject=CST%20413shapeimage_8_link_0